FI-P-311

Organization: Canadian Government Travel Bureau
Product: Advertisement
Year: 1969


Product copy

Make the world go away.

Instead of elbowing your way into a jam-packed campground this summer why not stretch out in Banff Yoho, Riding Mountain Fundy, or Les Laurentides.

Our National Parks aren’t over-crowded. Not yet, anyway.

From Mount Revelstoke in British Columbia to Terra Nova in Newfound and beautiful Canadian National Parks go all out to accommodate you Not to mention 91 provincial parks and countless privately-owned campsites.

We have it al nicely planned so that, if you’re travelling the Trans-Canada Highway to one of our scenic or historic parks, you can pitch a tent all the way there and back, if you like. You’re never more than 50 miles from a picnic site or 150 miles from your next overnight campsite.

This means you’ll never have to get off the highway and show up at a sophisticated city hotel-motel or restaurant, all rigged out like an embarrassed Daniel Boone.

We’d like to remind you though that you don’t necessarily have to be a rugged individualist to enjoy a camping vacation in Canada. Many campgrounds are fully serviced. And some are downright cushy.

It all depends on you and how far back to nature you are willing to go.

Whether or not you opt for all the comforts of home we do promise you all the fun of a foreign country, good highways, gorgeous scenery, ten provinces, two northern territories, three oceans and umpteen thousand lakes. Plus a healthy buffer zone between you and the next tent.

Camp on our doorstep. We’ve got lots of spare room.

Above is a typical example of Canada’s more than 10,000 campsites. Below, Wild Animal Park in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan (one of the finest collections of wild animals in Canada, but, oddly, no moose). Camp north of the city at Buffalo Pound Lake, one of several provincial parks.

Clip and mail coupon below for all the facts on Canada’s campgrounds.Canadian Government Travel Bureau, Ottawa, Canada.


Source

The physical version of this product is part of the federal identity archive.